The tsunami of 26 December 2004 hit Sri Lanka two hours after the initial earthquake and killed over 35,000 people along the eastern and southern coasts. It destroyed approximately 100,000 houses and damaged or destroyed much of the infrastructure and public buildings in the affected areas. The shelter strategy developed for much of Sri Coastal communities like those in the Hambantota District of Southern Sri Lanka were very badly affected when the Tsunami struck without warning on 26th December 2004, following the under-sea earthquake near Indonesia. Click for Large Map of Sri Lanka (104kB).

The tsunami had a huge human, physical, economic and social impact.

The emergency phase was followed by the reconstruction

It destroyed approximately 100,000 houses and damaged or destroyed much of the infrastruc-ture and public buildings in the affected areas.

Fears of waterborne disease outbreaks were not realized in the coastal regions of Sri Lanka affected by the tsunami partly because there was public awareness of the need for well disinfection in addition to personal and food hygiene. Click for Large Map of Sri Lanka (104kB).

Sri Lanka's coastal drinking water supply continues to suffer the effects of the December 2004 tsunami. The shelter strategy developed for much of Sri Lanka Coastal communities like those in the Hambantota District of Southern Sri Lanka were very badly affected when the Tsunami struck without warning on 26th December 2004, following the under-sea earthquake near Indonesia. Impacts of the 2004 tsunami on groundwater resources in Sri Lanka. Tsunami waves caused by a 9.0-magnitude earthquake near Sumatra affected over two thirds of Sri Lanka’s coastline and caused catastrophic destruction on 26 December 2004. Some 40,000 shallow wells were destroyed or contaminated by the tsunami.

2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: how Aceh recovered, and Sri Lanka declined Damien Kingsbury In Aceh, Indonesia, rebuilding after the 2004 tsunami led to the end of three decades of bloody conflict. Reports show that around 230,000 people were killed in 14 countries, including: Indonesia (which was the most affected), Thailand, Sri Lanka and India. The 2004 Tsunami in Sri Lanka The date of 26 th December, 2004, will be remembered for a long time by many people in Sri Lanka. Indonesian officials estimated that the death toll there alone ultimately exceeded 200,000, particularly in northern Sumatra’s Aceh province. The tsunami of 26 December 2004 hit Sri Lanka two hours after the initial earthquake and killed over 35,000 people along the eastern and southern coasts. The shelter strategy developed for much of Sri Lanka Analyses of the pre-and post-Indian Ocean tsunami periods did not show any significant change in the suicide rate in either the affected or non-affected areas of Sri Lanka (Rodrigo et al., 2009).

During this particular date, a tsunami of a large magnitude and scale hit the coastline of Sri Lanka (Liu 117). More than 31,000 people died, thousands went missing, about 440,000 people were displaced, and an estimated 1 to 2 million of the 19 million people were affected. The tsunami killed at least 225,000 people across a dozen countries, with Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, Maldives, and Thailand sustaining massive damage. My homework project for R.E on the Sri Lanka Tsunami 2004. enjoy. It destroyed approximately 100,000 houses and damaged or destroyed much of the infrastructure and public buildings in the affected areas. Sri Lanka, in terms of its population, was the worst hit during the tsunami, and it has also suffered worst in the aftermath, seeing the least coherent recovery – one that allowed a return to war. The tsunami of 26 December 2004 hit Sri Lanka two hours after the initial earthquake and killed over 35,000 people along the eastern and southern coasts. One of the hardest hit countries in the 2004 tsunami was Thailand, with over 4,800 confirmed deaths, 8,400 injuries and 4,500 missing. The tsunami of 26 December 2004 hit Sri Lanka severely and caused an emotional wave across the whole of the world that channelled massive sup-port to the affected areas.