Immanuel literally means "God is with us." That child would be a sign of God’s presence with His people. Jesus was God making His dwelling among us (John 1:1, 14). Jesus was God in the flesh. Two thousand years ago, in Bethlehem, we see that baby born and lowered into the hay for a resting place.

In the Isaiah passage, we translate the name as Immanuel, starting with the letter I, but in the Matthew passage we translate the name as Emmanuel, starting with the letter E. The different spellings ultimately are because of different vowels used in Hebrew and Greek in this name: and the Word became flesh and dwelt among us . The virgin Mary bore a son. To say that Jesus would be called “Immanuel” means Jesus is God, that He dwelt among us in His incarnation, and that He is always with us. Immanuel with an "I" is a transliteration of the original Hebrew word composed of “Immanu” (with us) and El (God), while Emmanuel with an "E" is a transliteration of the Greek "Emmanouel" (emphasis in the source).

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REFERENCE Immanuel is a transliteration of the original Hebrew word derived from Immanu (with us) and El (God), while Emmanuel is a transliteration of the Greek "Emmanouel." The Hebrew word Immanuel is really a phrase that means “God with us.” God told King Ahaz, through Isaiah the prophet, that a mother would bear a son and that people would call Him Immanuel. What is the meaning of Emmanuel (or Immanuel)? Immanuel or Emmanuel The King James Version of the Bible uses the spelling Emmanuel. The English Standard Version and others (e.g., NASB, NLT, NKJV, HCSB, NIV) use the spelling Immanuel. . The fact that Matthew wrote of the Messiah’s “name” being “Immanuel” in verse 23, but “Jesus” in verses 21 and 25, clearly shows that Matthew understood that one name (Jesus) was a given, literal name, while the other (Immanuel), similar to Jesus’ title “Christ,” characterized His essence. This is significant because Jesus is God in flesh: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God . However, there are some English translations of the Bible that do not adhere to this. Whether spelled with an I or an E "every name of Christ is like a honeycomb dripping with honey, and luscious are the drops that distill from it." It comes to this: Immanuel is the English translation of the Hebrew “עמּנוּ אל” (‛immānū’ēl) and Emmanuel is the English translation of the Greek “Ἐμμανουήλ” (Emmanouḗl) which is … God keeps His promises. . .