The American Folklore Center describes Samhain as the biggest and most significant holiday of the Celtic year. Halloween evolved from "All Hollows" Eve. The word "Halloween" comes from"All Hallows' Eve" and means "hallowed evening." It allowed the souls of the dead to come back to earth and walk among the living. The origin of All Hallows' Eve. To help put to rest the negativity that has surrounded this holiday, I decided to write a post about All Hallows Eve history. If you have Celtic heritage, it is very likely that someone in your family tree celebrated Samhain. They would also carve … Tracing the Origin of All Hallows Eve Elements of pagan celebrations were often incorporated into the new Christian religious festivities in an effort to ease newcomers into the Church. All Hallows' Eve. A Brief History of Halloween. This may have been an attempt to control Pagan Samhain celebrations by replacing the holiday directly, or at least drawing away much of the attention—but Samhain continued to remain a highly popular tradition. The history of Halloween goes all the way back to a pagan festival called Samhain. It originated from the pagan holiday honoring the dead. Later, November 2 nd was designated All Souls Day to celebrate the dead who were not saints or martyrs. All Hallows Eve bridged the gap between two cultures and made the new religion sweeping Scotland more recognizable. It's here, it's here! All Saint’s Day was also known as All-hallows or All-hallowmas which had come from the Middle English ‘Alholowmesse’ meaning All Saint’s Day. Some Christian groups still practice some of the Holiday traditions: like … The costumes and the trick-or-treating may come from a mix of Celtic and Middle Ages traditions. We have celebrated All Hallow’s Eve every year on October 31 for centuries with headless ghosts, howling witches and groaning Frankenstein monsters. The name Halloween (originally spelled Hallowe'en) is a contraction of All Hallows Even, meaning the day before All Hallows Day (better known today as All Saints Day), a Catholic holiday commemorating Christian saints and martyrs. The spelling of Halloween derives from it’s earlier name All Hallows Even (or eve) which took place the night before All Hallows Day, now known as All Saints Day. All Hallows' Eve falls on 31st October each year, and is the day before All Hallows' Day, also known as All Saints' Day in the Christian calendar. On All Hallows Eve, the veil between the world of the living and the world of the dead was thin. Some modern historians, notably Ronald Hutton (The Stations of the Sun: A History of the Ritual Year in Britain, 1996) and Steve Roud (The English Year, 2008, and A Dictionary of English Folklore, 2005), flatly reject the popular notion that the Church designated November 1st All Saints Day to "Christianize" the pagan Celtic holiday. The holiday gets its roots from Celtic harvest festivals with pagan roots. The history of Halloween goes all the way back to a pagan festival called Samhain. Since it was held the night before All Saints Day, Samhain became known as All Hallows Eve, and later Hallowe’en. It allowed the souls of the dead to come back to earth and walk among the living.