2001). this week: 5.0 in Nuquí, Chocó, Colombia.
Fault lines are located in many parts of the world and are closely related to the structure of the Earth. Measurements made using Global Positioning System (GPS) indicate 18 mm/year of lateral strain and 3mm/yr of convergence on the OFZ near south-eastern Cuba, and 8-11 mm/yr on Jamaica.

Such faults often lead to orogeny (the shaping of the earth's crust through tectonic activity), such as the creation of mountain ranges seen arising along fault lines. New GEM dataset of active faults in the Caribbean and Central America Richard Styron Wed 31 May 2017. This information was provided by the participants in the 1999 CDMP Hazard Mapping and Vulnerability Assessment Workshop. The Caribbean and Central America has had: (M1.5 or greater) 24 earthquakes in the past 24 hours 109 earthquakes in the past 7 days; 829 earthquakes in the past 30 days ; 10,479 earthquakes in the past 365 days; The largest earthquake in The Caribbean and Central America: today: 3.9 in Tortola, British Virgin Islands. The Walton and Enrriquillo Faults are also left-lateral strike-slip features that separate the Gonave sliver from the Caribbean Plate to the south. Black solid lines are fault zones; blue triangles are broadband stations; red stars are earthquakes shallower than 20 km, and white stars are earthquakes deeper than 20 km. Local Tectonics. The Caribbean and North American tectonic plates are scraping by each other, making a huge transform fault that extends from the Puerto Rico Trench to the coast of Central America. Most earthquakes strike less than 50 miles (80 kilometers) below the Earth’s surface. – S.E. direction, El Soldado fault in the Gulf of Paria (Russo 1990) and the South-West Tobago Fault System in south-west Tobago (Snoke et al. Other significant faults are the Los Bajos fault cutting the south-west peninsula in a N.W. Individual fault lines are usually narrower than their length or depth.

It’s important to understand the causes, impacts and responses to this tectonic activity. – S.E. Earthquake data the Septentrional fault zone shows some obliquely convergent motion (DeMets and Wiggins-Grandison, 2006, Benford et al., 2012). Existing Hazard Maps in the Caribbean. The Himalayas in the Indian subcontinent and the Rocky Mountains of North America are examples of … The Global Active Faults project of the GEM Foundation aims to produce a globally complete, reasonably homogeneous dataset of active faults on the Earth's surface for seismic hazard assessment. Caribbean Tsunami and Earthquake Hazards Studies- Seafloor Map To help understand the origin of the unusual bathymetry, gravity, and vertical tectonics of the plate boundary and to provide constraints for hazard assessment, the morphology of the entire 770-km-long trench from the Dominican Republic in the west to Anguilla in the east was mapped with multibeam echosounder during three cruises in 2002 … The Northern boundary of this micro plate is made up of the Oriente Fault Zone, where left-lateral strike slip is dominant at 14.2-14.5 mm/yr (Benford et al., 2012), and the Septentrional fault zone. of the Caribbean plate (Weber 2010; 2007). The Caribbean plate is shifting east, while the North American plate is shifting west. Other significant faults are the Los Bajos fault cutting the south-west peninsula in a N.W. this week: 5.0 in Nuquí, Chocó, Colombia.

2001). of the Caribbean plate (Weber 2010; 2007). The following table summarizes current availability of hazard maps in the English-speaking Caribbean. Reverse faults refer to those fault lines that result from blocks of crust sliding above each other rather than separating from each other. The Caribbean and Central America has had: (M1.5 or greater) 24 earthquakes in the past 24 hours 109 earthquakes in the past 7 days; 829 earthquakes in the past 30 days ; 10,479 earthquakes in the past 365 days; The largest earthquake in The Caribbean and Central America: today: 3.9 in Tortola, British Virgin Islands. direction, El Soldado fault in the Gulf of Paria (Russo 1990) and the South-West Tobago Fault System in south-west Tobago (Snoke et al. GSPRFZ, Great Southern Puerto Rico fault zone; GNPRFZ, Great North Puerto Rico fault zone; CGF, Cerro Goden Fault.
The Puerto Rico Trench, north of Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands, is an undersea fault zone.