ESA has commissioned the world's first mission to recover a piece of space debris in orbit. REMOVEDEBRIS has been the first low cost mission to perform key active debris removal (ADR) technology demonstrations including the use of a net, a harpoon, vision-based navigation and a Dragsail in a realistic space operational environment.

Orbital debris is any man-made object in orbit about the Earth which no longer serves a useful function. The first space mission to remove an item of debris from orbit, ClearSpace-1, will be planned for launch in 2025. RemoveDebris is an EU (European Union) Framework 7 (FP7) research project to develop and fly a low cost in-orbit demonstrator mission that aims to de-risk and verify technologies needed for future ADR (Active Debris Removal) missions. It is not an end-to-end demonstration of a full ADR mission. Such debris includes nonfunctional spacecraft, abandoned launch vehicle stages, mission-related debris and fragmentation debris. RemoveDEBRIS is aimed at performing key Active Debris Removal (ADR) technology demonstrations to find the best way to capture the estimated 40,000 pieces of space debris that is orbiting Earth. RemoveDebris Mission. “This is the right time for such a mission,” says Luc Piguet, founder and CEO of ClearSpace. The operation is being secured as a service contract with a start-up-led commercial consortium, to help establish a new market for in-orbit servicing, as well as debris removal. In this context, the RemoveDebris mission makes a significant contribution to the state of the art being the world's first Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions to demonstrate, in orbit, key future debris removal technologies and besides testing novel technologies (such as the net or harpoon) for the first time, has also set up an architectural design from which future missions could be based on. The ELSA-d target spacecraft, to be built by SSTL, will be released and captured by Astroscale's "chaser" spacecraft as a test of orbital debris removal technologies.

The mission is being procured as a service contract with a startup-led commercial consortium, to help establish a new market for in-orbit servicing, as well as debris removal. Mission overview There are more than 20,000 pieces of debris larger than a softball orbiting the Earth. 12) The mission is still under design and launch is not foreseen for a few years. Platform Launch Mission Status DebrisSats Payload Ground Segment References.

To demonstrate the feasibility of space debris removal, engineers with the ClearSpace-1 mission will launch a four-armed robotic junk collector to retrieve Vespa, a … Upcoming missions to tackle debris removal include CleanSpace One by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne), Switzerland, which aims to use microsatellites with a grabber to demonstrate capture. Active Debris Removal (ADR) is necessary to stabilise the growth of space debris, but even more important is that any newly launched objects comply with post-mission disposal guidelines – especially orbital decay in less than 25 years.

The first space mission to remove an item of debris from orbit, ClearSpace-1, will be planned for launch in 2025. ClearSpace-1 will be the first space mission to remove an item of debris from orbit, planned for launch in 2025. The European Commission funded RemoveDebris mission has been the world's first Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions to demonstrate, in orbit, some cost effective key technologies, including net and harpoon capture; and elements of the whole sequence of operations, like the vision-based navigation, ultimately planning to terminate the mission with the deployment of the dragsail to de-orbit … ESA has commissioned the world's first mission to recover a piece of space debris in orbit. The operation is being secured as a service contract with a start-up-led commercial consortium, to help establish a new market for in-orbit servicing, as well as debris removal.